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dc.contributor.authorBaşar, Erol
dc.contributor.authorÖzgören, Murat
dc.contributor.authorÖniz, Adile
dc.contributor.authorSchmiedt, Christina
dc.contributor.authorBaşar-Eroğlu, Canan
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-21T11:46:54Z
dc.date.available2016-04-21T11:46:54Z
dc.date.issued2007-04
dc.identifier.issn0167-8760
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11413/1049
dc.description.abstractThe present report introduces, as a first study, the concept and methods of oscillatory brain dynamics to analyze well-known (familiar) and unfamiliar face processing in the 800 ms following a face presentation. We analyzed event-related oscillations in young, healthy subjects (N=26) by using three types of stimulation: (1) a simple light signal, (2) the picture of the face of an anonymous elderly lady and (3) the picture of the subjects' own grandmother. We found a number of significant peak to peak amplitude measures in all frequency bands in the time period of 0-500 ms, allowing a differentiation between perception of the subjects' own grandmother, the unknown elderly face and the light stimulation. The results showed increased event-related oscillatory responses elicited by the unknown face compared to the known grandmother a) in the theta responses (4-8 Hz) at T-6 (46%), b) in the gamma (28-48 Hz) responses at C-z (22%) and C-3 (38%) and c) in the beta responses at F-4 (46%), C-z (47%) and P-3 (105%). In contrast, the subjects' own grandmother elicited 20% increased fast theta (6-8 Hz) oscillations at F-4 compared to the unknown face. Delta responses dissociated face from simple light processing, as reflected in the observation of approx. 50% higher amplitudes at the occipital compared to the frontal locations during face perception. We conclude that the described multiple brain oscillations clearly differentiate the known and unknown faces with varied degrees of selective-responsiveness in a short time window between 0 and 800 ms. Furthermore, the results are in conceptual accordance with the "selectively distributed processing" hypothesis. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier B.V.tr_TR
dc.language.isoen_UStr_TR
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, PO BOX 211, 1000 AE AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDStr_TR
dc.relationINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGYtr_TR
dc.subjectDeltatr_TR
dc.subjectThetatr_TR
dc.subjectAlphatr_TR
dc.subjectBetatr_TR
dc.subjectGamma Oscillationstr_TR
dc.subjectEEGtr_TR
dc.subjectERPtr_TR
dc.subjectFace Recognitiontr_TR
dc.subjectSemantictr_TR
dc.subjectEpisodictr_TR
dc.subjectMemorytr_TR
dc.subjectWorking Memorytr_TR
dc.subjectNeurocognitiveNetworkstr_TR
dc.subjectFusiform Gyrustr_TR
dc.subjectBeta Frequencytr_TR
dc.subjectVisual Cortextr_TR
dc.subjectAlpha Bandtr_TR
dc.subjectHuman EEGtr_TR
dc.subjectResponsestr_TR
dc.subjectGammatr_TR
dc.subjectTetatr_TR
dc.subjectAlfatr_TR
dc.subjectGama Salınımlarıtr_TR
dc.subjectYüz Tanımatr_TR
dc.subjectAnlamsaltr_TR
dc.subjectAralıklıtr_TR
dc.subjectBellektr_TR
dc.subjectÇalışan Bellektr_TR
dc.subjectBilişsel Ağlartr_TR
dc.subjectBeta Frekansıtr_TR
dc.subjectGörsel Kortekstr_TR
dc.subjectAlfa Banttr_TR
dc.subjectİnsan EEGtr_TR
dc.subjectTepkilertr_TR
dc.subjectGamatr_TR
dc.titleBrain Oscillations Differentiate the Picture of One's Own Grandmothertr_TR
dc.typeArticletr_TR
dc.contributor.authorIDTR142226tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorIDTR143075tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorIDTR59951tr_TR
dc.contributor.authorIDTR186954tr_TR
dc.identifier.wos246091900011
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-33947586615
dc.identifier.pubmed16996628


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